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Jeffrey  

I’m here again with Patrick Rocca of Bosley real estate and Patrick, why don’t you introduce yourself and tell the listeners what you do. 

  

Patrick  

Hey, good morning, Jeffrey. It’s happy to be here by the way, Patrick Rocca here with Bosley real estate. I’m a realtor broker here in the Midtown area Leaside Davisville area of Midtown Toronto. And looking forward to an exciting 2024 in the what I think is going to be an interesting and a positive market, hopefully.  

  

Jeffrey  

I think that we ended 23 with a little bit of a change in the market where I noticed that there were obviously a lot less available, but to also heard rumblings that it was actually a buyers market for a change. Let me know if you’ve seen that, and if anything has changed as we get into 2024.  

  

Patrick    

Well, you’re absolutely right. And you’ve nailed it on the head. The end of 2023 was definitely a buyers market. Of course, it’s a buyers market, if sellers are willing. And again, we ran into that issue where, you know, some sellers were unreasonable. But prices fell off, obviously, at the end of last year. And inventory was sitting, and there was great opportunities for buyers to get into the, to the market. Yes, rates are higher. But you know, there was transactions happening, I did a few deals towards the end of the year and trying to convince buyers that it is a buyers market is always a tough one. Because as we’ve discussed in the past, you know, buyers, they always, they always think they can time the market. And they always think that they’re gonna wait for the bottom. But as we’ve said many many times, there’s two things in real estate you can predict. And that’s the bottom and the top. Yeah, yeah, it was, it was a good time to buy. And it’s still a good time to buy. But I suspect we’re going to see a bit of a rebound here in the earlier part of the year. And yes, you’re right, there was no inventory at the end of the year. And some of the inventory that was sitting, much like the stuff that’s sitting right now was the stuff that was not realistically priced. And, you know, sellers were hanging on for their April prices when you know, we were in November, December.  

  

Jeffrey  

There’s a little bit of pressure now, from the external sources where the rumors that the Bank of Canada is going to start cutting rates. And so, we’ve already seen some of the big banks lower their rates in terms of their fixed term product. And so are you seeing or hearing from buyers that there is a pressure now to kind of get a property and lock in on a mortgage? 

  

Patrick   

I’m not necessarily saying that they’re going to they want to lock in on a mortgage, or that that pressure is there. But what I’m seeing is that buyers, I think are finally getting it in terms of you know, hey, maybe we should act now. Yes, you know, we’ve got a Bank of Canada announcement tomorrow, I suspect, as most people do, that they’re going to hold tight and nothing’s going to happen. The rumor is, is that we’re going to start to see rate cuts towards the second quarter, maybe towards the end of the second quarter, May, June. But, I mean, I think that buyers are feeling a bit more positive. Now we haven’t had a bank hike in, I think, three or four meetings. So I mean, I’m getting a ton of calls. Right now. I mean, I’m doing a lot of evaluations, I had many, many calls over the holidays. I’m talking to a lot of people who want to list because those people that were thinking of listing in the fall understood that it was, you know, kind of a quiet market and buyers weren’t out there. But now buyers are out there, I’m getting calls daily from buyers and from agents who are like, I had two calls yesterday from agents who are like desperate for inventory. There’s nothing on the market. We’re heading into the third week of January when you typically start to see more product come available. I mean, I’ll just take Leaside as an example. I mean, we’ve had one listing since the new year. And that was a listing that was on the market before Christmas, and didn’t sell. So we haven’t had any new product. And you know, but that’s not uncommon. We really do start to see stuff roll out. This week. We haven’t seen anything yet. But for sure next week. I have a new one coming out next week. I’m telling sellers now you should do it because buyers are out there and I’m hearing and it’s not necessarily in the Midtown area, at least David so I haven’t seen that yet. But I’m hearing through our company and in other areas in the city where you know, there are multiple offers. I mean, we’re talking I can condos situation we’re talking freehold situations where there are some multiple meetings happening again. And but again, I have to preface that by saying I haven’t seen that yet, and Leaside and Davisville. But who knows, but I mean, that just shows you that there are buyers out there who were not there in the fall. So it’s, it’s a great time to put your house on the market. And again, sorry, I’m rambling here, but, you know, we’ve got a funny sort of time over the next six weeks or so I mean, you know, we’ve got a good February, that’s probably going to happen, we’ve got a family day weekend in the middle there, which will quiet for that weekend. And then we head into March and March Break is for two weeks. I mean, you’ve got the public and private, but Easter is early this year, is at the end of March. So I suspect you’re gonna have two, maybe three weeks in March that are going to be very quiet, maybe not as much inventory. And, you know, talking with a few of my colleagues yesterday, the fear, I mean, not necessarily the fear, but I mean, people are going to load their listings on after Easter, and then you’re going to have a lot more product. And could that have an impact on, you know, on what’s happening, but I mean, if you’re selling right, now’s a great time to put your house on the market and buying there’s not a lot of products. It’s get out there and there’s there’s gonna be some good homes. I know. I’ve got a few good ones coming up.  

  

Jeffrey 

Let’s take that one that you’re listing next week as an example. What sort of advice have you given to the sellers in terms of things like pricing, preparation, anything that they need to do in terms of making sure that they are able to get the best offer for their house?  

  

Patrick   

Well, I mean, you know, I hate to say it, but I mean, it’s an architect’s own home, so it’s quite a stunning home. It’s, gorgeous renovation, three bedroom, two story addition, prime location and south Leaside. It’s so good. But still, every house needs preparation. Every house needs staging. So we’re gonna be staging it this week, we’re gonna be doing photography and floor plans on the weekend, we’re going to be pricing it at realistic market value, we’re not going to underprice it. I still cautious about underpricing in this market, because I just don’t, I haven’t seen it yet in my area where you underprice something, which is something I’ve never done in the past anyways. So we’re going to price it, you know, to sell and we’re going to price it to what we feel is fair market value. And if we get more great, but you know, we’re going to be looking for offers, and it’s a great and we’re not doing an offer date. And it’s a great house. 

  

Jeffrey 

Like you said that’s the type of thing that, you know, people who do sell, you know, you do need to do some preparation. It’s like you, like anything else in this world, you do need to do your research, do some preparation, so that when you’re ready, you can look at, you know, how long is it going to take to sell the house? How long is it going to take to close? You know, what are my constraints in terms of timing, right, for first time sellers?  

  

Patrick   

You know, it, there can be a lot to consider. And, you know, that can really increase the timeline. Yeah, and I mean, you have to be realistic with your sellers. I mean, I’m still of the mindset that I’m advising my sellers that listen, you know, especially this one here, I mean, not necessarily saying they’re gonna be the guinea pig, but they’ll probably be one of the first listings out and Leaside. And, you know, it could sell in three days, it could, it could sell in two weeks. So, as long as you’re patient, as long as you know, you got a good home a good product, it’s priced, right, it shows Well, it’s marketed properly. I think you’re in good shape. But if you’re if you’re pricing and you’re still reaching for those prices of April of last year, it’s it’s not a it’s not a good thing, right? To be realistic. And I’ve said that time and time again. And I know I sound like a broken record. But sellers, sellers have to be realistic and buyers do too. I mean, buyers have to understand that when something comes on the market. You know, your agent should be able to justify why it’s good value and why it’s priced the way it is. I mean, there’s nothing more frustrating as a listing agent and I had one before Christmas, where I have people coming to me and wanting to lowball on already a lowball list price, you know something that was listed in 2023. That is basically a 2020 price. And I still got buyers and buyers agents who want to lowball that price and I’m like, do your homework and they’re coming to me to say why do you think it’s worth more? And I’m like, Well, you know, do your math. Do your homework. Do you like doing like do your research don’t ask me to do your research. Because there you know, there’s there was some good value there, right?  

  

Jeffrey 

Yeah. 100% agree on that. And like you said, when there were a lot Little bit fewer products on the market, you know, and people thought that, you know, they saw a little bit of a decrease in price, then they said, Well, I can wait or I can pressure the sellers, because I know they’re not going to get their price. But, you know, as with all stuff, you know, you can’t sort of force a situation and be able to kind of predict or say that, well, I think they’re going to take 10% less, you know, if, if that provides good value provides good value.  

  

Patrick   

Exactly. I mean, if you look at the Toronto real estate statistics that came out, just last week, or two weeks ago, I mean, the average price in December of 23, was actually up over the average price of December of 22. In the Toronto real estate board, and there was actually more transactions in December of 23, than there was in 2022. So I mean, it’s not like I mean, 2022 was bad. I mean, you know, there was, it was silent, it was very eerie in the fall, it was very quiet, this fall this past fall, 2023. But it was more active than 2022. So it’s not like, you know, the sky has fallen. I mean, we’re definitely not back where we were in 2021. But, you know, it’s, that’s the market, right. 

  

Jeffrey  

And I know, there’s some people who do read newspapers still, or, or look at news feeds that say that Toronto is real estate market is horrendously overpriced, and, and they’re waiting for the prices to come down. I’m reminded of a friend of ours who sold their house most probably 10 or 12 years ago waiting for the price to come down. And they eventually moved out of the city because the price never came down. Now, I’m not saying the price won’t come down. But you can’t sort of think that you’ll just wait. And again, like you said, be able to time the market or time a major decrease in prices, and let that dictate your schedule.  

  

Patrick  

Yeah, you know, it’s all about being in the market, as opposed to trying to time the market. So you have to get into the market. And you’re right, over time real estate increases. And I mean, we have the big thing that’s driving our market. You know, we’ve got record immigration. And we have a housing crisis we have, we have no housing. There is, you know, record immigration coming into the GTA, and by all looks, I don’t know until we have a change in government, I just don’t see it happening. And they’re not building enough. They say they’re building or they say they’re going to build, but I mean, you can’t have this amount of immigration, and no housing product and trying to catch up. I mean, it’s a it’s a losing proposition. I mean, something has to be done. Because, you know, the stuff that’s going on in our cities, in terms of, you know, immigrants coming in and living on the street and living in churches and basements. And it’s sad. But, yeah, we’ve got a housing crisis. And it’s, it’s linked to immigration, for sure. And there’s no place for people to live immigrants, let alone, you know, our Canadians or people who are trying to get into the market. 

  

Jeffrey 

You’re absolutely right. And, you know, if you look at on a long term, I mean, we’ve been in this house, over 20 years, and at the time, it was, you know, very, very scary to sign on the dotted line. And we thought we were basically buying at the top of the market. And, you know, again, I’m not predicting anything, but the prices have gone up, and we’ve been able to pay down some on the asset. And so, if you are, you know, renting or otherwise, you know, not getting into the market, you’re not paying down an asset, right, so you’re taking time away from the ability to increase the value of an asset and pay down so that you’re able to leverage that. And so I just want to caution everybody, you know, you may think that you’re going to save 10 grand, you know, by either under bidding a house or waiting it out, but over 20 years, you’ll put that amount will probably seem trivial and compared to the overall perspective of housing and your investment.  

  

Patrick   

You’re absolutely right. And I mean, I can use my own situation as an example of that. I mean, I remember buying my house, and I’ve been in it for at least 15 years. And at the time, I was back in the day and I mean, there were still multiple offers and, and I knew I overpaid and you know, you’re sitting there and you’re going oh my God, what did I do, but, you know, at the end of the day, it was in the market, I got a good house and you know, it’s worth way more than what I paid and that’s, that’s the way you got to look at it. It’s you know, you’re better to be in the market than outside and paying someone else’s Mortgage. 

  

Jeffrey 

That’s right. And, and that’s something coming from you as, as a real estate agent, you know, knowing that you overpaid, still feeling a little bit of angst on that, but then thinking long term, you know, it was in this market anyway, it was a good investment to get in on  

  

Patrick   

For real estate in general, I mean, if you, you know, I’ve bought a lot of real estate in my time and property in the States. And, and, you know, it was scary buying them too. But I mean, again, it’s the market over time, unless you’re, if you’re a flipper, and you’re in it for, for, you know, trying to make money short term is dangerous. And it can be dangerous, because you can buy high and, you know, you look at people that bought in 2022, in the spring, and by 2020 22, in the fall, their property was worth 20%. Last, right. So, but if you’re, if you’re in it long term, you don’t have to worry. Yeah, yeah. And, and this advice probably doesn’t apply to somebody who is buying a property as an Airbnb, for instance, to rent out or stuff like that, right? Those are more like completely different situations, we’re probably we’re talking about houses that you are going to occupy you’re going to live in, and like you said, you’re going to live in, not for the short term. Correct? Correct. Yeah, you know, in investment, inventory and purchases, I mean, in air being and renting, that’s, that’s become a bit of a quagmire in terms of, you know, landlord and tenants and dealing with all the other things that come along with that. So I mean, you’re going to start to see a bit of a downfall of that, because, you know, what happened during COVID was, you know, tenants not paying their rent, and it’s carried over. And there’s still lots of issues going on. And I think you’re going to start to see in the next few months, and we’re seeing it already. We’re landlords are one of the landlords anymore. Yeah, there’s, there’s no incentive in it for them. I mean, that the Tenant Protection Act, gives them no protection, it protects, the tenant gives them all the rights. And why would you want to own property? I mean, when I get people coming to me, and they say, Well, we could sell or we could rent, and I’m like, you could rent. And I’m happy to help you with that. But you don’t want to do that. Because here’s what I’ve experienced in the last six months, and I’ve experienced more clusters in the last six months with tenants than I’ve ever experienced in my career. It’s just not a good situation.  

  

Jeffrey  

That reminds me of got my vacant house form that I had to fill out for the City of Toronto, where, you know, they’re trying to get more houses into the market for rentals or whatever. Have you seen any effect of that over the past couple of years? 

  

Patrick 

How do I answer this politically correct? Because I don’t want to get political. But I think that is BS. I mean, this whole vacant home tax is ridiculous. I still don’t know. Nor have I seen the the cost versus, you know, the effect on this, in terms of you know, what it’s cost the city to do this and then how much they’re making on it. I think it’s ridiculous. Is it going to put any more inventory into the market? Absolutely not hadn’t seen it? Is it going to cause issues? Yeah, I mean, I got older clients. I mean, I sent out a reminder to all my clients last week to file before the February 29 deadline, and I had people coming back to me saying, well, we felt we did it last year. And I’m like, Yeah, but you got to do it every year. I had a client last year. And this is a sad, sad story. And this tells you how much of a cluster our city is. There, their son passed away. They had fought unexpectedly and tragically, they had filed with the city, the vacant home tax. And, obviously, obviously, there’s exemptions, and this was one of them because of a death. And they get a tax bill and now the city tax because it was a vacant property. They lost the paperwork, they it took months to figure out and the stress, I mean, you know, the stress on a family that’s dealing with, you know, the death of a loved one, and you got the city coming in and doing this for what mean it’s, it’s asinine. It’s just a waste, in my opinion. You know, attack and tackle the issues at hand, build housing, do it now. You know, list the barriers and the issues with getting permits and, you know, it’s just, it’s ridiculous as they get home tax is ridiculous that people don’t understand they have to do it every year. And if they don’t bring that into the tax bill, and good luck with the city trying to figure it out. Yeah, that that would be a great reminder.  

  

Jeffrey  

Honestly, I actually forgot until I got a reminder about doing it. So, to everyone listening, it’s in Toronto, please do fill that out every year. Or as Patrick says, you will get something in the mail and you will not be pleased. 

  

Patrick   

But this has nothing to do with getting more housing into the market. This is strictly the city trying to get money. And I don’t know how much money they’re getting versus what it costs to set this program up. 

  

Jeffrey 

Yeah, that would be a question for another call. But if, if people want to get a hold of you, what’s the best way to get a hold of you?  

  

Patrick   

Well, as always, you can call me directly through my office at Bosley at 416-322-8000. If I’m not in you can just leave me a voicemail and I return my calls like literally immediately. And or the best way to get ahold of me is via email. And I’ll get back to you as soon as I can, which is usually within the hour. mail@patrickrocca.com.  

  

Jeffrey 

Fantastic. Well, Patrick, it’s been great to chat as always about what we’re, we’re hearing and what you’re seeing in the market. And I look forward to touching base maybe later on in the spring or early summer to see what other changes have been in the works for the market.  

  

Patrick   

Absolutely. And I appreciate your time, Jeffrey. Yeah, I think I think our next phone call, or I hope our next call will be a positive one. And I’m always the glass is half full type of guy and I I suspect it will be in. It looks promising, I think for 2024.  

  

Jeffrey 

Yeah, fingers crossed. All right. Thanks again, Patrick. Take care.  

  

Patrick   

Thanks, Jeff.  

  

 

Jeffrey: 

I’m here with Patrick Rocca, Bosley Real Estate here in Midtown Toronto. And,  I know that we have talked to Patrick,  several times in the past. He is an authority on Midtown real estate, but why don’t I let Patrick tell everyone about him and what he does. 

Patrick Rocca: 

Hi, good morning, Jeffrey. It’s Patrick Rocket here with Boley Real Estate,   in Lisa.  I predominantly worked in the midtown area, Leaside and Davisville area, and I’ve been doing this for 30 years.  

Jeffrey: 

Yeah, that’s right. We did touch base last time about 30 years in the business. Bit of a difference since,  February,  March, 1993, where, you know, we used faxes, we used lots and lots of paper, and things generally took a lot longer. Now people have access to more information for better, for worse. And,  things tend to happen a lot quicker. And even in the market, we’re seeing changes in the market, which happen quicker. So we talked last around the spring market, so maybe you could bring us up to speed now that we’re in October.  What are the changes that you’ve seen in the market? 

Patrick Rocca: 

It’s kind of very eerie. It’s, it’s,  somewhat similar to last year’s trend,  but with different economic and world impacts happening that are affecting the market.  We had a fairly good spring.  when I say fairly good, it was, it was good right through till May, June, as it always usually is. Summer as usual was quiet.  you know, people are traveling more now and,  but there was still some transactions happening.  interest rates continued to rise,  and a lot of uncertainty in the market, and the fall has not picked up as we had hoped or expected.  there seems to be a little uncertainty and concern in the market, or lack of competence.  buyers,  everybody’s wondering what’s gonna happen on October 25th with, with the bank rate.  inflation did come down,  recently, so in my opinion, I don’t see the need for another rate hike, but with the Bank of Canada, one never knows. 

Patrick Rocca: 

So I think a bank hike in this area in time is going to be not good.  I think if they pause and do anything,  I think that maybe put a little bit more confidence back into the market and,  I think that’s what buyers are looking for. So hopefully they don’t do anything. Hopefully we get a little bit more confidence back in the market and maybe we’ll have a better ending to our fall market right now. There is a heck of a lot more product stuff sitting a lot longer,  and,  we’re not seeing multiple offers,  like we used to that are few and far between.  so it, it, and prices are down. Prices are down from, from Sprint for sure. 

Jeffrey: 

Yeah, and that’s what I’ve been hearing anecdotally about, you know, pricing and, you know, the, the effects, like you said, inflation,  interest rates, a little bit of uncertainty,  but also there’s kind of,  a couple of other things that are on the horizon as we speak right now. There’s,  you know, internationally a lot of uncertainty about what’s gonna happen,  with a few of the international conflicts. And,  as we know in 2024, the US goes into another election cycle. So there’s all that stuff going to be happening as well. Now we’re gonna switch gears a little bit.  the, the, one of the key things that I’ve been hearing about is the fall, the precipitous fall in terms of vacation properties or in terms of cottages north of the city. Do you have any clients who are either interested in those or, or have invested in those and are looking for their next step? 

Patrick Rocca: 

 no, no, I, I don’t personally.  I know people who have bought, I know people that bought during the pandemic,  prices went crazy there.  We have an office in Thornbury,  and,  in talking to the top agent up there,  a week or so ago,  this market’s back down to 2019 prices.  so pre covid prices, I mean, they’ve had a big drop off.  I think a lot of it has to do with, in my personal opinion, again, I’m not as familiar with that market, but we’re seeing that here too there’s, there’s, there’s, there’s a lot of debt.  interest rates have, has, have risen,  people’s carrying costs have increased substantially.  so people are looking to unload stuff like that.  and we’re seeing that effect here in the Toronto market as well, where I’m hearing any personally, I I’m not seeing any of my own clients,  affected, but I can tell you, I hear your stories if, if not daily, weekly about,  people’s personal situations with debt and, you know, credit card debt, as you know, is, is, is way up. 

Patrick Rocca: 

The banks came out and said that it’s, it’s higher and it’s, it’s ever been.  and I’m hearing stories of people’s mortgages coming up for renewal that will double and triple.  so, you know, there could be a bit of a reckoning in, in that sense.  but I’m not seeing that rate yet. I’m hearing that,  I’m hearing a bit about it in 9 0 5, but,  I’m hearing in the city, but I am hearing stories .  And I think that’s a concern,  as well,  into 2024 with,  you know, mortgages. I think I heard some crazy statistics, like 10 to 20% are already in default, and there’s another 2% that are coming up for renewal in the next six to 12 months. So, I mean, there’s, there’s gonna be a, I think a bit of a reckoning there. 

Jeffrey: 

And,  sometimes it affects buyers in the kind of lower tier of the market, whether you’re talking about condos or entry level. Well, entry level is kind of a, a, a funny term when you’re talking about a million plus for a, for a detached house in the Toronto area. But,  a lot of times, you’re right, those buyers really stretch to get into the market. They’re counting on, you know, maybe being able to stretch and meet payments, and then the value of their property goes up so that, you know, if for instance, they do need to sell, you know, after purchase, they aren’t completely underwater. But, you know, as you said,  properties are, you know,  staying on the market a little longer now, so perhaps prices aren’t rising. And then you’ve got the double whammy of increased carrying costs. You know, inflation, everything is more expensive as well, you know, like you said, if your, if your mortgage payment is up 50%, or, or even I heard, they, they’re doubling. If you started out with a, you know, two point half, 2% variable and then you’re gonna renew at five, 6%, there’s going to be significant pressure on certain parts of the market. 

Patrick Rocca: 

A hundred percent. Yeah. You know, and, and, and like I said, I mean, I’m hearing, I’m hearing those stories and, and that’s, that’s obviously concerning as, as well as we, as we head into the, the, the, the new year, right? 

Jeffrey: 

 and affordability is always something that we touch on.  You know, in this type of market, even internationally, I’ve seen news stories that say, you know, Toronto, Vancouver, even by international standards are overvalued and they’re going to be, you know, kind of coming down over the next six to 12 months. Now, we’ve, we’ve heard those stories for the past 20 years, but,  these days, again, with the cost of housing being what it is, are you seeing anything in terms of buyers saying, you know, this is, this is getting a little bit outta hand. I’m going to wait for a period to enter the market. 

Patrick Rocca: 

So yeah, Jeffrey, in terms of affordability and, and buyers,  and their thoughts on the market,  as I was previously mentioning, I mean, we had similar, this has been going on for years. Buyers think they can find the market. They think the market’s gonna fall more.  You know, I’ve always said there’s, there’s two things in real estate you can’t predict, and that’s top and the bottom last year where we had a drop off from the spring,  , I’m using as an example, and Leaside selling for 1.92 million. They were selling for 1.5 in November, October.  people were still waiting, and of course they went back up to 1.8, 1.9 in, in February, March of this year. So, I mean, you can’t find the market.  I think that the big thing now is, is, the rates for affordability. 

Patrick Rocca: 

I mean, it’s, it’s really, and, and, and the cost of living, I mean, let’s, let’s be honest. I mean, I think what’s really driving inflation,  obviously is, is gasoline, is, is the number one thing.  You know, we need gas for everything, right? And, you know, you look at the, again, I don’t wanna get political, but you, you look at the carbon tax, and I mean, it, it’s had a significant effect on, on, on gas,  you know, the, the farmers being taxed,  you know, the tax, the, you know, it just, it, it’s rolled all into one.  and you know, I, you know, the cost of food has gone significantly because of all these other factors. So, I mean, it’s not just, you know,  mortgage rates and interest rates, it’s, it’s, it’s everything. So it’s a big cluster. And like you mentioned previously, we’ve got a few wars going on in the world, so there’s uncertainty right across the board. But I mean, now is a really, actually, I, I know this sounds crazy, and this is not the real estate agent in me speaking,  but it is, I mean, it’s a good time to buy now. I mean, I sold the property three weeks ago,   for 1.7 million, the same property sold in May for over 1.8. So there’s a discount right now . 

Jeffrey: 

, I mean, is it 

Patrick Rocca: 

The bottom? I don’t know.  So if you’re a buyer and you’re qualified and you can afford,  you should be looking at buying. I mean, you know, the reality is, rates aren’t gonna come down anytime. You know, in my opinion, we’re mid 2024 and we see maybe a decrease. It, it, it’ll be good, but I don’t, there’s nothing’s gonna happen before then. So, I mean, that’s the way I look at it. 

Jeffrey: 

Yeah. And I, I think I know the property you’re talking about, and I was quite surprised at the price it actually went for, because, you know, previously it was, it’s, you know, a, a solid property, it’s a little dated, needs some upgrades, but, you know, I would’ve expected that to go for significantly more than it actually went for. So, you know, is that a case of, of timing where maybe there weren’t as many buyers on the market at that point? Maybe people were just, you know, they took their foot off the gas and said, you know, I’m not going to invest at this point. But did you see, when you were doing the showings, did you see a lot of interest in that property? 

Patrick Rocca: 

There was a lot of interest.  But again, cautious buyer, the open house just after Labor Day,  it was one of the first properties that had come out, and the similar property on that same street literally sold for over 1,000,008 in May. So, I mean, if you are looking apples to apples, I mean, we figured we were gonna get more than 1.8.  in this situation. Obviously we didn’t, we got 1.7, that’s a significant prop. But what was key in this situation was not only, you know, I mean, I ended up getting a couple of offers. I had to reduce the property, but I ended up getting a total offer. But in this instance, I had a very realistic seller. People were very reasonable. They understood the market, they understood what was going on and what you’re seeing now.  and, and it’s clear. 

Patrick Rocca: 

I mean, just for example, if you take, well, in Davisville, over 30 listings on the market and lease side is over 30 listings on the market. If you take Leaside, for example, prior to Labor Day, there were 12 listings. Now we’re over 30. A lot of those have been sitting, and they’re sitting for a reason in my opinion. You’ve either got an agent who’s overpriced it and or has no control over their client that is not advising them properly, or you’ve got an unrealistic seller.  So if you’re, if you want to sell now, and if you have to sell now, the key thing is you gotta be realistic. You can’t be chasing 2022 prices. It’s just not there. You have to be in tune with the two days’ market. And that’s unfortunately where we’re seeing a lot of these properties sitting.  and it, it’s, it’s, it’s unfortunate . 

Patrick Rocca: 

 so I mean, being realistic is really key. I mean, we’re seeing it, it’s very interesting. We’re also seeing on our daily reports,  on the system, if you, if you look at Davisville on these sites, lots of price changes, lots of terminations, lots of relists . 

Patrick Rocca: 

Sometimes people re-listing higher than what they were originally listed for, which is incredibly stupid.  and it’s, it’s, you gotta be realistic. You have to be, as an agent, you have to have control and be able to advise your client. And, you know, I, I walked away from a listing last week where the seller thinks he’s gonna get huge. He was off by a million dollars in my opinion, and I, I don’t even want it. And he wanted me to do it for nothing. And I’m like, no, why would I do that? You’re gonna be a hundred, sorry, a million, at least overpriced, and you want me to work for nothing. Wow. And I’m like, I don’t, I don’t want it. I don’t need it. And you try to advise people, but they, they, some people just are stubborn and have it in their own mind, and they, they look at 2022 and they’re still, you know, dreaming and technicolor . 

Jeffrey: 

and things tend not to go well.  historically for people who hold on for a high price, you know, they think, well, you know, even if I have to carry this for X more months, if I hold it on the market, I’ll eventually get my price. And you, the, what we’ve seen is that the market just doesn’t work like that. If, you know, number one, if your house is on for more than the average days on market, people are like, okay, what’s wrong with it? And, and number two, you know, if, if you’re continually above what the average price is doing, if the average price is falling, again, people are like, this is not a reasonable situation. I don’t, I don’t wanna negotiate with a seller who is not really realistic about what their property’s worth. 

Patrick Rocca: 

Yeah, you’re a hundred percent right. I just recently got called into a situation where the individual had listed with an out of area agent, and clearly it was overpriced. And,  of course I get called in after the fact, after it hasn’t sold. And,  to, to seek advice as to, you know, what they need to do. And of course, you know, I have to be, I have to be honest, I tell people what they should hear, not what they want to hear. And I’m like, you should have been at this price. And now if you listed with me, I’m gonna have to list you lower than what you should have. Because, you know, if you would’ve listed at that price in the first place, you would have been sold.  but you list it high, you list it without an area agent, and now you’re gonna get less than you should have if you had done it properly in the first place. 

Jeffrey: 

Yeah, yeah. 

Patrick Rocca: 

Like I said, you’re, you’re, if the sellers are realistic enough, they’re educated properly,  and they, they do it right in the first place. And if it doesn’t work in seven to 14 days, you have to adjust quickly.  you can’t sit around and, and keep hoping and waiting. I mean, right now we’ve got, what, four weeks, six weeks left of a good market 

Jeffrey: 

 and, and or, 

Patrick Rocca: 

Or what’s left of this market . Yeah. 

Jeffrey: 

So 

Patrick Rocca: 

I’m saying to people now, if you have to sell, be realistic. If you don’t have to sell, maybe wait till spring because the activity is really slow right now. 

Jeffrey: 

Okay, yeah, that’s a great point. And it, it brings us back to something we touched on,  in, in an earlier conversation is, you know, if you do have to sell in a specific market,  you know, it, it’s really is better for you as a seller to go with someone who’s got local experience and someone who sells a fair amount of properties, who can hear what’s going on, who’s going out to speak with other agents, and, you know, who’s got a certain amount of volume. Because you have to, like you said, it just very quickly to what’s happening in the market. And if you’re someone who sells, you know,  I don’t want to pick on the 9 0 5, but if you’re somebody who doesn’t have local experience, you know, it’s very difficult to understand what’s happening very locally and be able to adjust quickly enough to advise your seller properly. Yeah, 

Patrick Rocca: 

No, you’re a hundred percent right. It’s,  that’s, it’s, it’s very key. It’s like if someone came to me and asked me to list a property in, in, in Mississauga or something, why would I do that? I, I don’t know that market. I’m not doing my client any justice. Right? 

Jeffrey: 

Yeah, yeah. That’s exactly right. And,  I think that, like you said, sometimes for a seller, it’s a good idea if you get the right advice to, to wait if you’re not pressured to sell. But for a buyer, if you’re looking at something in this market, as you mentioned, if you are properly financed, if you’re properly set up, this could be a good opportunity, one of the few opportunities in the last couple of years,  to get a property that you may not have thought was possible. 

Patrick Rocca: 

You’re a hundred percent right. I mean, you know, we’re, we’re, we’re, we’re at a discount now. I mean, are we gonna discount further? Like I said, I don’t know.  Spring usually is a better market than fall, but you know, there’s, there are other factors that are in play right now, as we discussed earlier with, you know,  mortgages coming up for renewal and,  you know, the war and, and all this stuff. So, I mean, but spring historically is always better. So, I mean, if you have, there’s lots of people that have to sell and there’s reasons for that. They’ve bought something else.  you know, there’s all sorts of reasons why people have to sell. I, and again, I’m like a broken record, be realistic, otherwise you’re gonna say it. 

Jeffrey: 

And, and sitting is the enemy of selling as you, as you mentioned before. So, Patrick, it’s been a great chat, you know, always something interesting to talk about in the market. If somebody wants to get a hold of you, what’s the best way for them to do that? 

Patrick Rocca: 

 They can call me directly at my office here at Bosley,  at 416 322 8000. If I’m not here, you can leave a voicemail, I can get back to you right away, or you can email me directly anytime.  mail@PatrickRocca.com

Jeffrey: 

Perfect. Alright, Patrick, well,  thanks again for the chat. I hope the last few weeks of the fall market go well for you and your clients, and I know we’ll chat soon. 

Patrick Rocca: 

Absolutely. Thank you very much, Jeffrey. Have a great day. 



Jeffrey:

I am here with Patrick Rocca of Bosley Real Estate here in Midtown Toronto, and we’ve talked to Patrick quite a few times in the past. And I’m going to let Patrick tell everyone about him and what he does.

Patrick:

Hi, good morning, Jeff. Patrick Rocca here with Bosley Real Estate in the Midtown area. I predominantly work the Leaside Davisville Midtown North Toronto area. And yeah, happy Tuesday.

Jeffrey:

Yes. Fantastic. So, Patrick we were talking last and you reminded me that you’ve been in this business for 30 years and 30 years, a lot has changed. So take us back to 1993 and, and what it was like. This is kind of, you know, early to pre-internet, really. So how are things different?

Patrick:

Wow. Yeah, they’re a lot different. I was getting married in 1993, which was interesting. I was just starting out in the business. There actually was no business. It was very, it was a very quiet market at that time. We were coming out of that that real huge downturn of the late eighties, early nineties, high interest rates. So it was totally a different market. I mean the way we did business was different. There was, there was no internet, or we were just getting into the advent of internet, sort of in the mid, I would say the mid-nineties. Everything was done via fax. Like when, when I had clients who were looking for listings, I would fax them listings in the morning. It was kind of weird. We would get daily updates from the Toronto Real Estate Board on paper, like in a booklet.

Patrick:

And we would, you know, photocopy stuff and fax it to clients, and it was just yeah, it was very weird. Open houses were really a big thing back then. And I remember when I started just doing a lot of open houses and yeah, it was a very flat market. It wasn’t a seller’s market and it wasn’t a buyer’s market. It was just it was just blah. But I, I managed to get into it at a kind of a good time for me in, in my neighborhood. And it all worked out and sort of snowballed. Yeah.

Jeffrey:

Thanks for taking us back then. You know, faxes and paper and things have really changed quite a bit for not only for, for sellers, for buyers, for agents before we get onto the current market, do you have a feeling that with all this information flowing around, that things happen more quickly in the market, that, you know, transactions happen more quickly?

Patrick:

Oh, a hundred percent. Yeah. Everything is, is fast and furious now, even, even in the down market. I mean, I mean, with the advent of internet and, you know, people have more options and abilities to to, to research online all, albeit, that does not replace a realtor. So people can look online, they can look at what’s available, what has sold statistics all that sort of stuff. So, I mean, but stuff still happens very quickly. I mean, with the, with the age of the internet and, and everything that we’re dealing with yeah, things, things happen really quickly. I mean, when I put something online, like literally, it’s, it’s, it’s live. I mean, just an example, I listed something yesterday. I’ve already got 15 showings on it. So I mean, it’s, things happen much more quickly now.

Jeffrey:

Wow. And, you know, going back to the, the 93 market, I remember that, you know, there was a big, big run up in prices than all of a sudden, you know, things kind of came back to earth. Interest rates were in the, the high teens. If people can even imagine that, that’s, that’s crazy. But now, you know, there’s, there’s a whole bunch of different things that are actually happening to the market. So maybe you could talk to, you know, the, the, the seller side and, and the buyer side of what we’re seeing in the last sort of four to six weeks.

Patrick:

Well, it’s been, honestly, since we, we actually had a talk a couple of weeks ago, and even since then, things have changed. I mean, the reality is, is that no one really knew what to expect coming into 2023. I mean, we had a very interesting 2022, I mean, a big run up in the first three, four months of the year then with interest rates going up a softening of the market and subsequently a decline of prices. I mean, and, and it, they, they, that decrease ranged anywhere from 10, 12% up to 25, 30% in the outside of Toronto in the, in the 9 0 5. So, I mean, in, in, in my market specifically Midtown Leaside, I mean, it’s, it’s 12 15% down easy. Summer came last year there was nothing people traveled because of they were allowed to, and they were able to after all the, the lockdowns and chaos during Covid fall came, and actually, it, it didn’t come.

Patrick:

It was there. There it was like buyers sort of said, you know what? We’re on hold. We’re going to wait. We’re going to see what happens. And the fall was a very, very quiet time. There was transactions but they were few and far between. As I suggested back in the fall. And as I suggested earlier this year, I think when we talked, and when I talked to several of my clients, I think we flatlined in the fall. I was telling buyers in the fall, you know, buy now, buy now. It’s, it’s a good time. I mean, not stuff is sitting, there’s good opportunities. It’s down, you know, 15%. I mean, at least in our area from, from, from the peak. And of course, you know, some people did most buyers as, as is the case, sat on the sideline because they were reading the papers and they were reading all the experts apparently, quote unquote in the media that we’re saying, you know, it’s coming off another 25%.

Patrick:

I didn’t think that, I thought maybe there was a downturn for maybe another three, 5% potentially. It, that has not happened. We have started out of the gate this year just last week I did three deals multiple offers on one a hundred thousand over asking we are starting to see multiple offers. We are starting to see property sell over asking does that mean we’re out of the woods? Absolutely not. But it, it’s a sign that there are buyers out there. I listed with something last week. I had 33 showings in, in 24 hours, two offers, like I said, sold it for a hundred thousand over asking another, another property, same sort of thing. Sold it, not over asking, but I’ve got a, I’ve got a very good offer with a good closing firm condition firm offer, no conditions. And I’ve just listed something yesterday.

Patrick:

Again, I’ve had 15, 16 showings in 24 hours, I suspect it will be sold, and it’s a $3 million home. So, and we’re seeing it, we’re seeing it right across the board. We’re seeing it from, you know, $1 million properties, even up to the higher end. I saw something last week, a three high, $3 million properties sold to multiples. So I’m not saying the train has left the station but I’m saying that, you know, there’s, there’s some positive signs and how long that will continue. I, I, I don’t know, but it’s, if you’re, if you’re a buyer, you might want to get in now.

Jeffrey:

Yeah. And like anything on either side, you know, of, of any market situation, there’s people who basically profit or do better when things rise. And there’s also people who profit when things fall. And you know, there’s, you know, going back to the internet, there’s all sorts of information, and both buyers and sellers can be overwhelmed with the amount of information and opinions about, you know, should you sell, should you wait? You know, interest rates are going up now, they’re going down. And it really becomes difficult for someone who does not spend their entire day in real estate understand the market over years to really get a sense of, of what’s happening not only in the next sort of six to 12 months, but on a year to year basis. You know, we heard last fall, oh, the market’s going to come off in, in the GTA 30%, and, you know, people are going to be, you know, struggling to meet their payments because rates are going to rise so much. And, and to a large extent, like you said, things are, are less horrific than that. So, you know, in, in terms of what you advise your clients, how do you help them get a sense of what the, the, the direction is and provide them guidance and, and where to go, and whether they’re buyers or sellers?

Patrick:

Well, I mean, it’s different on, on, on both levels, right? I mean, if, if it’s buyers, I mean, I’m, I’m telling buyers. I mean, and, and you know, it’s funny, I was on a, a Facebook chat last night and I was looking, I didn’t comment on it because I just didn’t want to go there. But I mean, I’m, I’m listening to people talking about the market that have no clue, that one, one person was insinuating that you know, the market’s off and it’s going to come down like the 1980s, and it’s still plummeting. And I mean, it’s just, there’s so much misinformation out there on the, on the internet right now. And people, everybody thinks that they’re a professional realtor or professional real estate expert. And, you know, at the end of the day, it’s about working with a, an experienced person, someone who’s been there, someone who’s in the market.

Patrick:

I mean, you know, some people will say, oh, as realtors, we’re trying to spin a, a positive spin on the market just so that we can do sales. And, and, and that’s not true. I mean, we’re in the market. I, I’m, I’m seeing what’s happening and I’m being realistic. So if you’re a buyer, I’m telling you, you should be buying. I, I was saying that in November because it’s a good time. Yeah. The market may come off another couple percent, it ain’t coming off 2025, excuse my English. But it’s a good time to buy if you’re long term. If you’re a seller and you, you must sell or you are in the market to sell it’s a different game. You have to be realistic. You have to look at the market and understand that, listen, we’re not February, 2022.

Patrick:

I mean, the house that I sold this week for 1.7, very reasonable seller they understood that that property last year was 2.1. Mm. They realized they weren’t getting 2.1 in February, January of 2023. They got 1.7, they got a hundred thousand over there asking last year we would’ve probably listed at the same price. 1.599, we would’ve got two this year we listed 1.599, we got 1.7. So as a seller, you have to be realistic. You have to understand that the market has changed. Those sellers that are out there still hanging on. And, and there are people out there. I mean, right now inventory is still very low. And if you look at lease side, we’ve got 11 listings, you know, Davisville 14. And a lot of those are what we call retreads. As I’ve said that, you know, they’ve been on the market since last fall, and they’re not with the program. They’re not getting it. They’re overpriced. They’re still reaching and thinking of early 2022. They have to get into the mindset in terms of we’re in a 2023 market. It’s different. The prices are different, the strategies are different. You know, you have to price it, right? You have to present it well, you have to market it and time it properly. Those are the key things.

Jeffrey:

Yeah. And even going back to the internet, the, you know, these days there’s information, there’s also tools for those, those brave sellers who wanna go it alone. But like you said, it’s more than just putting pictures on a website and, and choosing a price. You know, a as you mentioned, you know, things change. And if you really don’t have the intelligence talking to buyers on a daily basis, understanding the market trends, you, you can then be left with one of these retreads, even if you think, oh, well, I, I’m going to save myself a couple thousand bucks by, by listing it on, on one of these sites.

Patrick:

Oh, yeah. I mean, and we see that time and time again, regardless of whether it’s a good market or a down market. And, and I, I have to sort of chuckle when I see that sort of stuff. I mean, my, I was talking to someone yesterday and they decided they were going to go with someone else because it was commission based. Well, good luck. I mean, you know, you get what your paper, I mean, anybody can sell their property. I mean, I always say to people, you can put a sign on your lawn, you can sell your property. You know, you know, Joe Blow from, you know, 0.5% realtor can sell your property. But the question is, is how much are they going to sell it for? How much are you going to sell it for? You want, I mean, people look at commission and they, they think that they’re saving, but really they’re losing because, you know, a professional experienced realtor with a good program and a good system is going to get you more. It’s just, this is proven fact. It, it is what it is, right? Yeah.

Jeffrey:

Yeah. And, and like you said, with, with the current seller you just worked with, if they got a hundred thousand over asking and their property sold in a reasonable amount of time, that’s, you know, going to make up for hopefully the, the commission savings, but also the stress of having a, a product on the market, you know, that doesn’t sell. It’s kind of like putting something on one of those auction sites and it doesn’t sell, and it’s there. And then when people see that the days on market is over, you know, 30 days, 45 days, they begin to think, oh, well I can just offer a low amount for this pro property cuz they are getting desperate. Right. So you’re, you’re, you’re absolutely right. You know, you have to look at the entire picture. You may be saving on the front end, but you could be losing on the long end because in a market which doesn’t have, you know, real significant momentum, you may find yourself kind of over under thinking where you’re going to go in terms of marketing. In terms of pricing your property.

Patrick:

Yeah. Well, I, exactly, and I mean, you know, I, and I deal with this daily. I mean, I, you know, I, I had a gentleman called me in November, wanted to list his house. I pulled it up on the internet, I was out of town, and I was going to talk to him when I came back. And I was just outta town for the weekend for a, for a wedding. And I arranged a meet with him on the Tuesday, and he told me where his house was and what it was, and I pulled it up and you know, he was thinking his house was worth at least a half a million more than what I thought it was worth. And I, I told him, you know, politely that I didn’t think it was worth where he was, but we would talk about it when we met.

Patrick:

Anyways, long story short he canceled the appointment. I never did meet with him, listed with someone else, listed it at the price that he told me he thought it was worth it did not sell. It’s now with a second realtor, still too high. I had, you know, someone call me this morning and say, you know, what do you think of this? And I said, well, it’s, it’s, it was half a million overpriced. Now it’s 200 overpriced. It’s on the second realtor. And you know, the person saying, well, what if I offered him what you think it’s worth? And I said, I don’t know if he’ll take it. Because again, it’s an, an unrealistic seller. So that’s unfortunate too, right. You have to deal with unrealistic sellers.

Jeffrey:

Yeah, yeah. And, you know, we’ll, we’ll always have, you know, those type of sellers. And you know, to a certain extent there’s a kind of like, like you said, if, if somebody is, you know, determined, bound and determined to get their price, you know, they can, you know, continue to sit and sit and sit, eventually maybe something will come up. But it could be a significant amount of time. And most people real estate transaction is a very big deal. It’s a significant amount of money, and it could be a lot of stress, especially if you want to sell and you are looking to move to somewhere else, another property, you’ve have to put everything on hold while you’re still in the midst of this transaction. For a lot of people, they don’t necessarily want to tie up that much, you know, mental energy in waiting for this type of thing.

Patrick:

Yeah, no, it’s, it’s, selling a home is very stressful. And I, and I completely get it. You know, everybody’s got issues going on. I’m, you know, I was dealing with something last week. I was supposed to be listing it yesterday and ended up being a death in the family. So we had to delay. And I mean, you know, you, you get people that have financial issues and, and I completely understand that at the end of the day, it’s my job to, you know, to sort of not separate myself from that, but to separate myself. I mean, and, and explain to people that, you know, listen, you know, I understand your financial restraints. I understand that, you know, you would like this much for the property, but at the end of the day, the market will tell you what the property’s worth. And my job is to get you what market value, what market value is, and what a, a buyer is prepared to pay, and hopefully what you’re prepared to accept. So that’s, that’s kind of where I, I come into play. Mm-Hmm.

Jeffrey:

Even in the design world, you know, you become a, an expert in, in design in construction, you’re an expert in real estate, but to a large extent, you’re also a bit of a, of a counselor where you have to evaluate someone’s situation sometimes, tell them the hard truth and, and help them understand sometimes that, you know, they may not get what they want for their property, but, you know, here’s, here’s the reality of what’s going to happen. And being able to, to be able to, to do that effectively, you know, a good communicator really does help them understand the reality of the situation. So it’s not just technical or market in information or lengthen the business. You have to have all those skills together.

Patrick:

Oh, a hundred percent. Yeah. Communication is key. And I mean, it’s funny, you mentioned about some of the things that I, that I deal with and I, I, I always, I kind of joke, but I, I’m, I’m very serious when I say it, I say to my wife, you know, I’m, you know, I’m a part-time psychologist, part-time funeral director, part-time. I mean, I deal with death and divorce and, and it’s just, I’m, I’m wearing so many hats and I have to sort of, you know, be that guy that, you know, and, and communication is key. I mean, you have to be able to communicate with people and, and explain to them what’s going on in the market, but also understand what they’re going through personally and it’s very important.

Jeffrey:

Yeah. I know honestly, I’ve dealt with a few realtors and you know, as a buyer or seller, you, you really want to have a sense of how other agents you know, relate to your agent. I, you don’t necessarily want to go with the agent who always, you know, is the one that, you know, other agents don’t like to deal with for whatever reason. You know, that can affect the, the number of, of showings and, and the offers if your real estate agent is just not pleasant to deal with. And so that’s the type of thing, communication, being known in the industry, really having a reputation as somebody who is, you know, fair, honest, and really will do what they say.

Patrick:

You know, what that is, that is so critical. And it’s funny you say that cuz the, the, the property that I, that I sold last week, one of the properties I sold last week, the agent, you know, started off by saying, congratulations on the sale of your other property. And I’ve heard a lot about you and I look forward to doing business with you. And, and I think that’s key. I mean you, you, you have to have not only a reputation with your clients, but a reputation within the industry. Funny aside, and funny story couple, couple of years ago, I’m sorry to, to veer off, but this is a funny one. A couple of years ago, an agent called me, was bringing me an offer on one of my listings. There was a couple of other offers, and he was asking me about the process and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah.

Patrick:

And I went through everything with him, and I told him how I was going to handle the offers and et cetera, et cetera. And he said, thanks, I’ll be back to you. Hung up the phone. He bum called me about a minute later. And I heard his conversation, and he was telling his clients about the process and about how I explained what was going to happen and how I was very reputable and very good to work with, and very fair. Which I, I I could hear the conversation and he didn’t know that he bum called me. So it was, it was kind of, it was kind of funny. So then I hung up and he ended up bringing me an offer. He ended up not getting it, but I told him after the fact, I said, by the way, I said, you bum called me this afternoon. And I said, I heard your conversation with your client. I said, it’s a good thing you didn’t call me a name.

Jeffrey:

Yeah.

Patrick:

I said, and he laughed. He goes, oh my God, you heard that? And I was like, yeah, it was all good. But he could have easily have said that, you know, Hey, you know, this, this guy’s an idiot and you know, he’s, he’s not good to deal with, but he, he actually did the opposite. And that that was a good, that was a good good feeling.

Jeffrey:

Yeah. And, and, and you know, this is a, a side that a lot of you know, homeowners don’t really understand is what happens within the industry with reputation. You know, with, with, even when we were in a situation a couple of years ago with a lot of multiple listings, and people would try to come in and do some, you know, I wouldn’t say dirty tricks, but you know, something which wouldn’t necessarily be, you know, condoned by the, by the industry. And, you know, often those type of, of agents, maybe they’ll do well in the short term, but long term, you know, if you’re representing clients, maybe you would think twice about taking an offer from this, this type of agent.

Patrick:

Yeah. No, you’re a hundred percent right. And I mean, honestly, if you’re an agent, you’ve been in the business, you know, 15, 20, 30 years there’s a reason for that. And you, that means you’re, you’re doing something right. So

Jeffrey:

Yeah. Let’s talk about the, the vacant home tax. City of Toronto was brought in to helpfully release some homes, which, which they think are being held vacant, and they could be put onto the market to you know, relieve some of the pressure on, on rentals. Let me know what your thoughts are on that.

Patrick:

I think I alluded to it when we had last talked, obviously, but I’ll just sort of give you my, my thoughts on it now and where they stand today. I think it’s ridiculous. I think the whole process the whole system what did it cost to set this up? What is actually going to be you know, where are they going to make their money? Is this really going to work? How are they going to police this? I just think that this is not going to do anything. This is another government intervention as governments do to think they’re showing people that they’re actually doing something. Now, as of February 2nd, which was a deadline, there had been 85% of the people that had gone online and filled out the application. The, the city in their infinite wisdom has now extended it to the end of February for the other 15% .

Patrick:

Which I, whatever, I don’t get it. I’d like to see how many homes this is going to free up. I think it will have zero impact, much like the foreign buyer’s tax. I mean, honestly, they implemented that in 2017 or the foreign buyers’ moratorium. I mean you know, there’s ways around that people figure that out. You know, in the anti-flipping legislation, I mean, that’s been around anyways. I mean, if you own a property, you buy it. If you sell it in under 365 days, you have to pay tax. These are all things that have come up that the government is, is, is introducing or reinventing to make it look like they’re doing something. And at the end of the day, I, I just don’t see it having any impact whatsoever on, on housing today. That’s just my, my personal opinion, and I think that a lot of people feel that same way.

Jeffrey:

And so your advice to buyers and sellers don’t expect a massive change in prices from this legislation.

Patrick:

Well, I mean, it’s, it’s not necessarily prices. It’s, it’s, well, I mean, is it going to affect prices? I don’t think so. Is it going to affect inventory? No. I mean, are you going to get a few more properties come on the market because you know, someone you know isn’t living in it? I mean, maybe, but is this going to be the, the be all to end all? Absolutely not. I mean, there, we, we’ve got a big, we’ve got bigger problems, and they’re not short-term fixes. And what the, what the, the governments are governments are doing is, you know, making it look like they’re doing something for short-term fixes. And this is not a short term fix. This is a long-term fix. So I mean, honestly, I just, I have to laugh at some of this stuff. It’s, it’s, it kind of makes me shake my head.

Jeffrey:

Yeah, yeah. This stuff, you know, like you said, over 30 years you see stuff come and it goes and, you know, sometimes it’s just kind of brought back again. Because like you said, there’s, you know, some fundamental challenges with the GTA real estate market that probably don’t have short term fixes. And, you know, the, as a buyer or a seller, you, you can’t be waiting for these things to come and, and really fix what essentially is longer term structural issues with the market.

Patrick:

Yeah, no, I, and I agree, and I mean, that’s the whole government issue is, is, is a whole different topic. But I mean, you know, and then they’re talking about in increasing immigration and, you know, where are these people going to go? I mean, where are they going to live? You’re talking 250,000 people a year. I mean, majority of them settle in Toronto, right? Because it’s a big city and, you know, where are they going to live? Where are they going to get healthcare? I mean, that’s another whole issue. I mean, there’s just it’s actually a, it’s a sad state of affair. Yeah. And I don’t think there is a short term answer to tell you the truth. I mean, there may be little fixes along the way, and I think that’s the best they’ll be able to do. But this is a, this is a long term issue that has not been thought out. And it’s not just the current governments, it’s past governments that just ran with, you know, with everything. Right? Yeah.

Jeffrey:

Yeah. I ha I have to agree with you and you know, we’ll, we’ll see over the next couple of months as we get into the summer how things transpire, you know, with all the big macro factors, interest rates, that sort of thing. But if anyone wants to get a hold of you, what’s the best way for them to contact you?

Patrick:

Best way to contact me is through my office here on Vanderhoof at by phone at 416-322-8000. You can also email me. I’m always constantly on my phone. I have immediate access to my email wherever I am, and I’ll get back to you right away. It’s mail@PatrickRocca.com

Jeffrey:

All right, Patrick, as always, it’s been great chatting with you and we’ll look forward to chatting in the next couple of months and have a look back on, on this call and see how things have transpired. Have a great rest of your week.

Patrick:

Absolutely. And I, I, I do hope it’s as positive moving forward as it’s been over the last three, four weeks. So fingers crossed.

Jeffrey:

Crossed. Fingers crossed. For sure. Thanks again

Patrick:

Thanks. Have a great day.

Jeffrey:

Thank you. You too. Bye-Bye.